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Digi­tal mass com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on

Dou­ble your digi­tal
Mar­ke­ting suc­cess in three simp­le steps

. . .

Digi­tal mass com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on has trai­ned our selec­tive per­cep­ti­on like a mus­cle and made it much more power­ful. Intui­tively, we dele­te ever­ything that is not important to us with just one click. Not only when Melis­sa from Ire­land once again has a spe­cial offer. We also dele­te the pro­vi­ders for which we have opted-in. This cau­ses sub­con­scious stress every day, which we per­cei­ve as a nega­ti­ve expe­ri­ence. Digi­tal mass mar­ke­ting is thus increa­singly beco­m­ing a risk to dama­ge the image of one’s own brand. The pro­ce­du­re below can help you avo­id image dama­ge in three simp­le steps while doub­ling the respon­se of your digi­tal B2B com­mu­ni­ca­ti­ons.

. . .

Gran­ted, digi­tal mass com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on is a gre­at thing. Among hund­reds of e-mails are always poten­ti­al new custo­mers, for which the effort is worthwhile and the sav­vy com­pa­nies brings exces­si­ve sales growth. But what about the mass of e-mail reci­pi­ents who do not beco­me custo­mers and who are con­scious­ly or sub­con­scious­ly annoy­ed by the e-mail? How much poten­ti­al is lost each and every day just becau­se the email reci­pi­ents click the but­ton for the spam fol­der ins­tead of log­ging out? Surely you also know peop­le who, becau­se of annoy­ing tele­vi­si­on or radio adver­ti­sing in the super­mar­ket, are alrea­dy con­vin­ced that they go far bey­ond the pro­duct ran­ge. This is simi­lar in busi­ness-to-busi­ness and anyo­ne who has a true qua­li­ty pro­duct to offer and does not want to sca­re poten­ti­al custo­mers should also rely on high qua­li­ty in digi­tal com­mu­ni­ca­ti­ons. Not just to bene­fit from its address data­ba­se in the long term. But above all, not to burn valu­able busi­ness con­tac­ts.

This is how suc­cess­ful B2B com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on works in three steps so that you will no lon­ger be dele­ted in the future

Fail­u­re in digi­tal com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on is easy to under­stand: you have your mobi­le pho­ne in your hand and fly over your emails or a soci­al media post – and even befo­re your con­scious­ness is actively thin­king, your sub­con­scious mind has sor­ted out what you find inte­res­ting and what is not , Just like you, all other peop­le react and with just one click the offer is dele­ted. That’s not sur­pri­sing. If you address many peop­le in the B2B area with mass com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on at the same time, decisi­on-makers with a cer­tain per­so­na­li­ty struc­tu­re will not feel addres­sed. Howe­ver, if the struc­tu­re of your com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on fol­lows the rule of three below, the result will look qui­te dif­fe­rent.

Gra­phic 1 | Trip­le method digi­tal B2B mass com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on

What hap­pens here through the three-pron­ged model is based on the fun­da­men­tals of brain rese­arch: 1. As you fly over the e-mail, the sub­con­scious takes on a mes­sa­ge that hits the ner­ve of your per­so­na­li­ty struc­tu­re and wakes your atten­ti­on. That In a frac­tion of a second, your sub­con­scious mind deci­des not to era­se the e-mail, becau­se the mes­sa­ge exac­t­ly matches your human natu­re. 2. In the second moment, your con­scious­ness swit­ches to and ratio­nal­ly cap­tures the short text under the head­line, the max. bet­ween 25 and 50 words. This text descri­bes the cur­rent chal­len­ge in your indus­try envi­ron­ment and thus crea­tes an imme­dia­te iden­ti­fi­ca­ti­on with your dai­ly busi­ness. Their logic reco­gni­zes, “Hel­lo, this has some­thing to do with the pro­blems in our busi­ness.” 3. So far so good, that was still easy. But now the view wan­ders to the actu­al offer below. Only if the pro­vi­der has now also done his home­work in mar­ke­ting com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on, he can get your full atten­ti­on. Becau­se an addi­tio­nal second later, you are alrea­dy see­ing the visu­al pro­duct offer and the sales con­tent. In over­flight, you can see how the offer is posi­tio­ned, why it is uni­que, what bene­fits you have and why you should buy it. Again, 50 words should not be excee­ded for the­se short texts. Becau­se less is more. Digi­tal com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on is fast food.

This pro­cess is incredi­b­ly fast in your mind with a maxi­mum reten­ti­on time of five seconds. If the pro­vi­der has done ever­ything right, he has now mana­ged that you do not dele­te it imme­dia­te­ly. He first com­mu­ni­ca­ted with your sub­con­scious mind, which you can not pre­vent, and imme­dia­te­ly after that crea­tes an iden­ti­fi­ca­ti­on with your envi­ron­ment. Whe­ther or not you are inte­rested in your offer now depends on the cur­rent situa­ti­on: whe­ther the offer meets an urgent need, whe­ther you alrea­dy have an ade­qua­te solu­ti­on in use or whe­ther it is just the right time for a new invest­ment. In any case, the pro­vi­der has signi­fi­cant­ly increa­sed his chan­ce, ins­tead of lan­ding in the spam fol­der to be taken to the next mee­ting. Below, let’s see how the three steps work in detail.

. . .

Pha­se 1

Busi­ness typo­lo­gies hit the ner­ve, rather than digi­tal­ly get­ting on the ner­ve

. . .

From brain rese­arch we know: the sub­con­scious mind makes the decisi­ons. With an average power of 40 mil­li­on bits per second, our sub­con­scious is far ahead of con­scious­ness at 40 bits per second. For this rea­son, busi­ness typo­lo­gies are also inva­lu­able for com­mu­ni­ca­ting with new custo­mers. Whe­ther digi­tal or face-to-face. Typi­cal bar­ri­ers and reser­va­tions that result from the psy­cho­lo­gi­cal impact of a per­son can be com­ple­te­ly eli­mi­na­ted wit­hin the first mil­li­se­cond with busi­ness typo­lo­gies.

Gra­phic 2 | Per­so­na­li­ty cha­rac­te­ris­tics Busi­ness typo­lo­gies

A visio­na­ry such as The Ame­ri­can bil­lion­aire Elon Musk, you need with argu­ments that rely only on num­bers, not to appro­xi­ma­te. His sub­con­scious lives con­stant­ly in the future and his thoughts are pri­ma­ri­ly about inno­va­ti­on. On the other hand, you can save any visi­on of the future by tal­king to the ban­ker about how your busi­ness model finan­ces your house bank. Only hard fac­ts and uni­que num­bers are nee­ded here. In both examp­les, whe­ther Elon Musk or your ban­ker, you run with the wrong address imme­dia­te­ly against a wall. So rather fol­low the fin­dings of sci­ence and use as shown here, a pro­ven busi­ness typo­lo­gy, as you alrea­dy about 20 years ago by Dr. med. Rolf Berth was deve­lo­ped. Here is a tip: Focus on the first four. Becau­se a “visio­na­ry” or “Robust Doer” always sits at the top of the com­pa­ny, a “trans­for­mer” always leads the deve­lop­ment depart­ment and the “ana­lyst” is usual­ly CFO or at home in purcha­sing.

. . .

Pha­se 2

Pro­vi­ding a solu­ti­on to the chal­len­ge in a ver­ti­cal indus­try crea­tes instant iden­ti­fi­ca­ti­on

. . .

Every indus­try and every rela­ted tra­de is struggling with some chal­len­ge that is typi­cal of their indus­try. Finan­ci­al insti­tu­ti­ons are figh­t­ing low mar­gins through low inte­rest rates and high com­pe­ti­ti­on from digi­tal com­pe­ti­tors. The insuran­ce com­pa­nies are figh­t­ing against high regu­lato­ry requi­re­ments and rising sales, ser­vice and admi­nis­tra­ti­ve expen­ses. For the com­pa­nies in the ener­gy indus­try, the varie­ty of fle­xi­ble tariffs and smart IoT end devices is a chal­len­ge in custo­mer com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on – and for Inter­net retail­ing, pri­ce trans­pa­ren­cy and simul­ta­ne­ous­ly high ser­vice expec­ta­ti­ons are a con­stant source of pres­su­re.

Gra­phic 3 | Ver­ti­cal indus­try com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on

So that ven­dors imme­dia­te­ly gain their undi­vi­ded atten­ti­on, they must set up the custo­mer glas­ses and see the mar­ket from their indi­vi­du­al per­spec­tive. Pro­vi­ding the solu­ti­on to the pro­blem is not just an ana­ly­ti­cal but also a crea­ti­ve task. Becau­se the­re are two ways for this stra­te­gy. Eit­her the offer imme­dia­te­ly meets an acu­te indus­try need and sol­ves an out­stan­ding pro­blem, bet­ter than its com­pe­ti­tors offer. Or a pro­blem is crea­ted. Not in the sen­se of an air­lock. It’s one thing that the indus­try is not dis­cus­sing inten­si­ve­ly yet, the com­pe­ti­tors of the pro­vi­der have not yet set up in bulk and, above all, one thing that gives you as a tar­get custo­mer a clear advan­ta­ge. So, if pro­vi­ders iden­ti­fy niches and crea­te solu­ti­ons to chal­len­ges that are not even on their desk­tops, but with which you sur­pri­se your col­leagues in the next team mee­ting, the wil­ling­ness to buy increa­ses signi­fi­cant­ly. Be it through new poten­ti­al in cost savings, increa­sed effi­ci­en­cy or through inno­va­ti­ve custo­mer bene­fits that give your com­pa­ny a head start.

. . .

Pha­se 3

Posi­tio­ned sales con­tent will tell your custo­mers imme­dia­te­ly, why your offer is the right solu­ti­on.

. . .

For suc­cess­ful sel­ling, the­re are two fac­ts that always app­ly: A. In order to gain the inte­rest of a custo­mer, sup­pliers need to get strai­ght to the point wit­hout detours – whe­ther digi­tal or face-to-face. B. Not the bet­ter pro­duct wins necessa­ri­ly, but with the bet­ter com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on. Let’s assu­me the fol­lo­wing situa­ti­on: You are going to a tra­de fair direc­t­ly at the mea­su­ring stand of a sup­plier. The lar­ge back wall car­ri­es a lar­ge, emo­tio­nal motif with a typo­lo­gi­cal head­line and a short sen­tence below that pro­mi­ses a solu­ti­on to a chal­len­ge in your indus­try. So exac­t­ly the two fac­tors as descri­bed here in Pha­se 1 and Pha­se 2. The booth has gai­ned your atten­ti­on and you are tal­king to a sel­ler of the pro­vi­der.

Gra­phic 4 | Basics of mar­ke­ting com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on

Now it depends. The sel­ler exp­lains to you in just 30 seconds how his offer is posi­tio­ned, why it is uni­que, what bene­fits you per­so­nal­ly have and what the per­for­mance of the offer leads to a com­pel­ling purcha­se con­si­de­ra­ti­on. And then stop. Not a sin­gle word any­mo­re. What do you think hap­pens now, when you visit after fur­ther con­ver­sa­ti­on, other stands from other sup­pliers, whe­re the sel­ler does not come so quick­ly to the point? Exac­t­ly. Your memo­ry asso­cia­tes the qua­li­ty of the offer with the qua­li­ty of the con­ver­sa­ti­on you had at the first booth. And that is exac­t­ly what app­lies to digi­tal com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on. The bet­ter the asso­cia­ti­on, the hig­her the qua­li­ty of curio­si­ty.

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© 2019 MOVING PEOP­LE GROUP
Stau­see­stras­se 3 | 86923 Fin­ning
Ger­ma­ny
Pho­ne +49 8806 69 59 321
Fax +49 8806 69 59 326
hallo@movingpeoplegroup.de

All rights reser­ved (Owner)
Coo­kies
AGB
Inprint
Data pro­tec­tion